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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
president obama's former campaign manager david plouffe and steve schmidt talk about the 2012 election. both mr. playoff and mr. schmidt attended the university of delaware. >> welcome back to the national agenda program. i'm director for the center of political communication. this is the final program of the 2012 presidential election season. i'm very very pleased that all of you are here tonight and i know that's a tribute to our two guest speakers this evening. two years ago in the wake of the sha lacking president obama took in the midterm congressional elections, the architect of the president's 2008 victory david plouffe stood on this stage and predicted the electorate voting in 2012 would be more diverse and younger than it was just two years earlier. he talked then about the growing latino electorate and he predicted that the obama campaign in 2012 would have to take advantage of those demographic opportunities. plouffe also predicted on this stage that the american people in 2012 would have had enough of republicans who were like glenn beck, sara palin and rush limbaugh. we are just
's not unique to this election or republican party. in 2004 many democrats believed he had a device on his shoulder so he would be given instructions during the debate. it's snanty. i think in our politics today both parties want to construct an image of their opponent that is not grounded in reaty. so the alternative universe. there are two. one is the romney campaign had an unrealistic view of what the electorate was going to be and that was one of the reasons they lost. certainly one of the reasons they went in the election confident. th wasn't an act. they thought they were going to win. but there is this view of barack obama. if you read and watch the conservative entertainment complex how could this guy get re-elected because we're socialist and week on terism and we're not honest and tt's not how most of america cease the president. even those that voted against us, most of them don't see us that way. so that is the problem. i think it's an underestimating of your opponent's strength and the reality of how people view them. d there was a ridicule that i think -- i don't fully unders
him, the people who elected him so he would defend the people. >> reporter: that could provoke more trouble after a weekend of violence hitting liberal and secular factions against morse's islamist supporters. last night in cairo, protesters threw rocks at police who fired back with tear gas. demonstrators also clashed with pro-morsi egyptians. attacks on the local offices of the muzz lum brotherhood left one teenager dead and dozens of people wounded. thousands of the president's backers staged rallies in several cities. >> we support mohamed morsi's correct decision and eventually the good from the bad will be distinguishable. we support dr. morsi. >> u.s. officials raised concerns about morsi's decree. today the state department's victoria newlyand called for calm. >> what is important to us is that these issues be slelgted through dialogues, that these issues be selgtzed democraticry. we are encouraged that the various important stakeholders in egypt are now talking to each other, that president morsi is consulting on the way forward but we're not going to prejudge where that wi
under investigation for misuse of campaign funds and was facing a congressional ethics probe. he won re-election to the house in november. jackson's seat is now expected to be filled through a special election. mortgage rates in the u.s. fell to record lows this week-- helping to boost home sales. the average 30-year loan rate dropped to 3.3%, the lowest on record since records began in 1971. on wall street today stocks moved slightly higher ahead of the thanksgiving holiday. the dow jones industrial average gained 48 points to close under 12,837. the nasdaq rose nearly ten points to close above 2,926. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and more now on the mid east story. will the cease fire reached today between israel and hamas, hold? and what about longer-term, more difficult issues between the two sides? ray suarez picks it up. >> suarez: i'm joined now by veteran diplomat and former ambassador nicholas burns. and hisham melhem, washington bureau chief for al arabiya tv. mr. ambassador, as you heard from the reporters earlier in the program, the shooti
the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten island. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the
. president obama's re-election means the taxes for upper income earners are going up one way or another. speaker john boehner deserves some leeway to try to mitigate the damage by negotiating a larger tax reform. leeway to negotiate sounds pretty sane to me. for some, of course, that's a great big lump of coal wrapped up as an early christmas present. >> revenue that happens to be the democratic code word for tax increases. that is simply not an acceptable position for any true conservative. republicans were not elected to rubber stamp obama's agenda. >> seems some news personalities may be taking a tax increase on the highest earners somewhat personally. anyway, republicans didn't win the white house or the senate. i wonder what other conservatives have to say about that. >> the republicans are in a shocking amount of disarray right now. the republican party has not developed an alternative idea set other than what mitt romney and paul ryan were campaigning on and sort of by default it has become their opening negotiation position. >> i see. so their opening position is the one that wa
and keith ellison. >> brown: then, president obama sat down with mexico's president-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporati
. >> the election's over. he won. congratulations. >> if we can get a few house republicans to agree as well -- >> we all agree but we're not going to raise taxes on people that make less than $250,000. we should take them out of this discussion. >> i've got a pen. i'm ready to sign it. >> he's got the republicans on the ropes and they know it. >> obama's answer to this budget crisis is to raise taxes on the wealthy just because he ran on that promise. and won the election. >> the president really wants to reach an agreement, he needs to be talking with the members of his own party right here in washington. >> it's too important for washington to screw this up. we really need to get this right. ♪ how do you like me now ♪ ♪ how do you like me now ♪ >> good afternoon, it is difficult to hold down the excitement here in new york. it is a growing frenzy that everyone's talking about. there are fantasies of celebration, if the numbers go their way. there are teams pooling resources. there's talk of high stakes and long odds. no, it's not the powerball lottery. it's the fiscal cliff. just
the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with more talk of avoiding the much-discussed fiscal cliff. but as november wound down, the president suggested an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks. in fact my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> you know me, i was born with the glass half full. i'm an optimist. >> brown: hopeful sig
the post-election changes in the house of representatives. >> woodruff: would building walls protect cities like new york from flooding after major storms? hari sreenivasan examines that as part of our "coping with climate change" series. >> as people continue to clean up from hurricane sandy, we look at what it could take to keep this damage from happening again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with
was elected to the board in november of 2008 and has served as board president since january of 2009. we will get to know him and talk about the toughest issues facing them. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? wh
obama running for the presidency in 2008. if he had lost the senate election, that is the level of national maturity we are talking about here. >> profiling historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned from those that have had the greatest impact on the issues of their time. sunday at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern part of the holiday weekend on c-span to. up next, the history of the presidential appointment process with public policy professor james sister that criticizes the current confirmation process and it talks about how it can be improved. this is just under an hour. >> what happens the day after the election when the president of homes of pointing? it will happen one way or the other. the romney transition team has been working on this for months and i am sure they are ready for it. the obama administration is ready to fill vacancies. this will have rebels all the way down the hierarchy. what i would like to discuss tonight is how we got from where we are, the politics of patronage, the challenges of recruiting political appointees , how the syste
. >> stephanie: good morning. >> caller: i would just like to say as opposed to past elections, wall street was all in with romney. they didn't split their conviction as usual. >> stephanie: right. >> caller: yeah, so instead of fighting them for a tax increase on the top 2% that america supports, let's gently go over that fiscal slope and then. >> stephanie: it's more like a fiscal bunny hill. i think with a good flying sauce as her weeding fine and go right into january. >> caller: fuzzy too right? >> stephanie: yeah. >> caller: gently go over to face asking slope and give 98% of americans a tax decrease and everybody will get what the american people wanted. >> stephanie: yeah within i have to say we're going to have a big discussion about this this morning. there's a lot of interesting different sides you're with patrick murray. senator murray is saying it's not a cliff it's a slope. he's saying it can be fixed fairly quickly in january. >> what we don't want is extending the bush tax cuts again, because that's what put us into this situation in the first place. >> stephanie: eric canto
thank you for doing this. i'm here with my political philosophy elective and we are looking for some terms to discuss the broad issues at play. i am wondering what are the best set of terms to discuss a policy failure, like the war on drugs? is it simply a question of return on the best meant that the money spent versus results seen or a question of the rapid expansion of government? is there a more moral dimension? the incredible rise of incarceration rates that have had a profound affect on certain committees? what are the best terms to discuss this question? >> all of those of very good terms. another i would add -- it has to do with cell definition 3 who are we at the people, as a society? the war on drugs has been going on for 42 years. i do not know any other war we would tolerate going on for so long that we will losing in spending so much money on. as a people, we are a civilization that believes he should not do things that are bad for you and that for society. that was a big motivation behind prohibition as well. this matter of what you believe is more important wh
demonstrated in support of the democratically elected president. >> he is trying to take care of the country. he is trying to secure stability for this country. >> reporter: rallying on his behalf, they are opposing the judge's club that calls for a national wide strike. lawmakers in the united states say while they appreciate their help brokering the cease-fire, his actions raise concern. >> to assume this kind of power is unacceptable to the united states of america. >> we don't obviously have want to see a democratically-elected aut ocrat take place of a dictator that was the case before that. >> reporter: opposition in support groups are planning competing rallies in cairo at locations less than a mild apart. it could set the stage for more violence. >> back at home, enjoy the nice weather. change is coming for the workweek, les birth? >>> it has been a pleasant holiday weekend weatherwise. we will see clouds rolling in and patchy fog. coast bay and inland, the temperatures will stay in the 40s, low to upper 40s along the coast and bay. by tomorrow, we will see highs in the 60s, once a
resigned today effectively ending what was a promising political career. two weeks after voters re-elected him to a ninth term jackson sent his resignation letter to the house speaker citing his ongoing treatment for bi-polar disorder and also admitting that he's made a share of mistakes. jackson is reportedly negotiating a plea deal that would allow him to resign for health reasons, serve some jail time for the alleged misuse of funds, repay those funds, and retain his congressional pension. the state of illinois will hold a special election to fill jackson's house seat although no date has been set. while democrats did well nationally in the november 6 elections, how extensive was their victory in california? for that we bring in political analyst larry ger sten. it seems like the election was ages ago but the votes have finally been counted. where do they end up? >> the democrats cleaned house. that's all there is to it. in every accepts of the term. they scored a net gain of four seats in the house of representatives which now tilts heavily for democrats by a margin of 38 to 15 for the
was a huge year. you had johnson resigning, decided not to go for another term. yet nixon's election, assassination of mr. king and bobby kennedy. you had democratic party's wild convention in chicago. so a lot of books on 68, woodstock and also months and that sort of thing. so i'm afraid my book is by no means unique. there's also a book on 1964, which makes pretty much the same argument as i do, only he sets a year earlier. i don't have been a huge quarrel with that. i wouldn't say i'm the only person who's right about this, the 65 did seem to be the time, not that it was the most romantic. 68 probably was in terms of world shattering, memorable events. but it was a time when the 50s and early 60s rapidly vanished or began to vanish from view and a hurry. the real reason, that's why. >> i think i've pretty much agree with you that the central year is 1965. but there's something more at stake in your book, at least i think so. i want to prove i'm not. in a way we can either be talking about the 60s and just talking about were 65 hits in the 1960s, but there's a claim in the book on
mention and that election the next couple of weeks is playing into these events? do people on the ground see this -- some level of this as political posturing? >> well, absolutely. there were many, many people during the campaign who felt that perhaps-- and certainly on the flip side, on the other side palestinians and in fact palestinian president mahmoud abbas accused israel of creating this campaign or going forward with the campaign to try and sabotage the u.n. bid -- the palestinian u.n. bid and also as a ploy for election -- for garnering votes for upcoming elections. for the incumbent government. the fact of the matter is, when i spoke with people on the ground today in the south, these are the constituents that would primarily vote for prime minister netanyahu and right now they're not very happy with him and many, many people said they're withdrawing their vote in the coming election, that they will not be voting for his likud party. they're unhappy with the fact that there was a pullback from a full-scale invasion. people living in the south who, again, have been through this s
to progressives, and having the president reelects and not electing governor romney is enough to make most people feel thankful, but one thanksgiving as we know it as nothing to do with the original thanksgiving right down to the paintings that we see. when we look at any painting of thanksgiving that we see when we were kids and we see the pilgrims and indians dancing around, we were starving, and the indians saved our lives, and we relaid them as only white people can, and the wompanoa were planes indians, and our whole image of thanksgiving is skewed. and it has been used to convince children that we got along fine with indians, and draw pictures of turkeys with our hands. president lincoln made it a holiday at the urging of the woman who wrote mary had a little lamb. it started with the spaniards who were the first ones to have thanksgiving, who massacred a bunch of indians, and a year later they were celebrating the safe return of the white people who weren't killed and it has evolved into this. it is one of those holidays that straddles the line of secular an
of whether or not to run for re- election, but if california becomes the number one state in the country on recovery side, first to solve the problem on the finance side. he has take an first step to do that. the next step will be can you keep local publics from going bankrupt. he will do that, as well. you will see a dramatic change in the employment category for california. when all that happens jerry will be able to go across the nation saying i didn't follow my need. >> nonif i should take off right now. the idea of him running for president yet again? what do you think? >> the country is open to lots of possibilities, i think, but a buddhist president, an 80-something-year-old buddhist president, i don't think we are ready for that. >> you don't see him doing that anymore. >> that is true, but -- . >> he is quoting the bible more. >> so, maybe he is running for something other than that, but it is not out of the woods yet in california. it is still a very tricky economy. it could go -- these bubbles could start bursting, as well. >> you have to understand that he has sped i
respective parts. he became very successful in the brew pub business. he never had a single election not even for stink -- a student council. governor? [applause] in keeping with the discussion, he is keen on innovation and things of that nature. i know that will come out. thank you, governor. >> are we all set? i am from the "mercury news," and we're here because we live in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been
are talking about but suppose we find our self election after election one winning the electorial college and not the popular vote? would that bother you? >> >> yeah. i suppose it would bother me and certainly consider a constitutional amendment if it happens all the time, yeah, but i would not -- i would not feel authorized to announce that the constitution has now changed. >> rose: does the court -- does the court that you know read the paper? does it understand the political dana milk of the moment? >> i don't know. i would have to ask each -- i think so. >> does it affect you? >> i hope not. >> rose: but is it possible that you -- >> no, i wouldn't be as unpopular a person as i am as i let it affect me. >> rose: you think you are unpopular because of protests here and there? >> well, yeah. when you want to designate -- on the supreme court -- >> i am. >> rose: yo you are there for them, aren't you? >> yeah. >> why do you think that is? i mean you have a, you have a great charming personality. you are a pretty nice fellow. i mean, you have friend across all aisles a you and ruth bad
is just elected. that's critical in making sure this works. >> they were a key broker. but they do have a key in this, hamas. it's a balancing act to say the least. >> definitely. >>> well, one of the most trying travel days of the year has come and go. hopefully, you're your at your destinations right now. getting from here to there, not easy when you look at the pictures. highways from coast to coast, just backed up for miles. chicago's o'hare airport socked in by fog most of the morning and that caused hundreds of delays. if that's not trouble already, train travel also shut down at new york's penn state shut down after the height of an evening rush. thanks to a power failure. >> overnight, here and now thanksgiving, we're safe here. no traffic in the studio. >> the weather is fantastic. here's a look at your holiday forecast. most of the nation will be enjoying pleasant weather. the rain has finally stopped in pacific northwest. seattle and portland will be drying out. seattle and dallas, though, you could see a few showers. >> temperatures on the east coast are well above normal. t
accomplishmentses at our next meeting. as you know, we had an election on november 6 and we had some interesting developments in terms of revenue, at least, at the state level we saw some relief being brought by prop 30. we also saw a couple of transportation measures that failed in alameda county and in los angeles, and i think that as we are analyzing the reasons for those results, it's important for us here in san francisco to have a better understanding of why perhaps that happened as we think about our own transportation needs going forward. of course, the most significant development at the federal level was the reelection of president obama. and i think that what that means for transportation, not only in the state of california, but nationwide, is pretty significant including, of course, what it does to high-speed rail. and the president has been a very strong supporter of that and that's something that we have been pushing for here in california and we want to make sure that we continue our efforts. but that certainly is a positive development on that -- on that front. as we move forwar
at risk if after the election in november iran goes after the iran. >> i am tad skeptical of hillary clinton's role. if it is a pitcher goes 7 knowings and shut down work and closer comes in and gets one run of support and gets credit for the win. is she getting too much credit for something must have been hammered before she arrived there? >> it was largely hammered out before she arrived. it may be president obama who gets more credit here. i think he pressured both egyptian morsi and israeli netanyahu to come to this deal. because i think he was afraid that the conflict would expand and that is where netanyahu gets political advantage. he has to recognize militarily it is fot a good out come for israel and he doesn't believe it will last. but he will say to president obama, when you wanted a cease fire i agreed to it that gives him chips visa vito the president down the road. and egypt stopping the smuggling of arm to hamas. happy thanksgiving to you, sir. >> coming up next, top economic turkeys of the year. lauren is on deck from the box business net work. companies that made the
in this atmosphere highly charged of the coming presidential election -- this is almost a year and a half ago -- that the ugly head of excessive partisanship raised its head and the ugly head of excessive ideological rigidity raised its head and the super committee deadlocked 6-6 which under the law left the meat cleaver to drop. the budget meat ax to drop. and that's what we're facing. we're facing something that nobody ever intended to go into effect. so how do we get out of this? we have people of goodwill that have to be reasonable and utilize a little commonsense, lessen their partisanship, lessen their ideological rigi rigidity, and that's the atmosphere that we can come together in. now, i want to tell a story and then i'm going to sit down, mr. president. i want to tell you the story about one of the brightest shining moments in government occurred back in 1983 when this senator was air youn was a youn. we were within six months of social security running out of money. and two old irishmen -- one who was president, his name was reagan; and the other one who was speaker, and his name w
times reports that prior to election day, the obama administration was developing a rule book for unmanned aircraft strikes on terrorists so that if romney won he would inherit clear guidelines. the issues are not as urgent now. obama won allegedly, but the administration is still pushing to formalize the rules and nail down exactly when deadly force is justified. they are debating whether drones should be a last resort against imminent threat to our country or something else like in pakistan where they are deployed against militants whose main grudge is with pakistani authoritiesment the president has miss givings telling one interviewer, quote, there is a remotist to it that helps us think somehow we can solve vexing security problems. for more, let's go live to qet red eye"'s correspondent chip herrington. >> i don't know how he got his security credentials. are we going too far with drones or not far enough? >> you are solving vexing security problems which is a nice why the stuff, but how do you do uj judge, jury and the such. you turn them into lengthy decisions and how
the politics are currently after the election. economists usually determine policy prior to tax rates. host: we are host: we are running out of time to give final thoughts as we conclude. what do you think is next on this debate? guest: we are weeks away from a deadline. an important one. where not only our tax policy is going to change but significant spending cuts are slated to take effect as well. i'm actually a little bit more concerned today than i was a day or two ago. in the sense at the moment policymakers are moving in opposite directions. in part that's the ways of washington and i think we'll see a few collapses before we ultimately get together somewhere in the days before christmas on a compromise. we have been talking about marginal tax rates, which i think are a key part not only of the budget question, but a key part of the broader economic question in terms of economic growth. and i'm hopeful that any solution that comes together is going to think a lot about economic growth and not just budgets. host: ethan? guest: i think i may be a little more hopeful than alex is. i think t
running for the presidency in 2008 -- if he had lost the illinois senate election, that is the level of national security we're talking about. >> we profiled historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned for those who have had the greatest impact on the issues of their time. this is on book-tv "afterwards" at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern on sunday on c-span 2. >> what about if the soviet union announced tomorrow that if we attack cuba, it will be a nuclear war? >> this thing is so serious. we are going to be an easy and we know what is happening now. you've got to use something. something may make these people shoot them off but i don't think as well. i will say this -- i must keep my own people very alert. >> have to hang on tight. >> it is amazing that eisenhower tells him to have his people alerts. everyone is completely on edge so course they are alert and kennedy lapse. he jocularly says hang on tightly to some nice moments on this terribly tense day. they are able to joke a little bit with each other and especially during this crisis, i think, they had a
a special election to fill the vacant seat. and in that letter, jackson added he prays to be remembered for what he did right. willie? >> kelly o'donnell in washington this morning, thank you and happy thanksgiving to you, kelly. >> to you, as well. >>> and now let's get a check of the rest of the morning's top stories. joining us over at the news desk is andrea. >> good morning to you all and happy thanksgiving. >>> we begin with deadly attacks in pakistan. a taliban suicide bomber struck a shiite muslim procession killing at least 23 people. more than 60 others were wounded. earlier wednesday, attacks in karachi left at least six people dead. >>> susan rice is defending her initial account on the attack in benghazi, libya, that left four americans dead. speaking at the united nations wednesday, rice said she was working off the best information she was given. >> when discussing the attacks against our facilities in benghazi, i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. >> rice considere
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)